NOTE: There will be no First Read on Monday, September 5.

 

WEATHER: Philadelphia, partly sunny, high of 83; Harrisburg, partly sunny, high of 81; Pittsburgh, partly sunny, high of 79.

 

NEW FROM CITY&STATE:

* As Mayor Jim Kenney’s new Pre-K initiative takes shape, some school officials and labor leaders are angry that the Philadelphia School District won’t be administering the program.

 

NEW THIS MORNING:

* In one of his first acts as Attorney General, Bruce Beemer dismissed former AG Kathleen Kane’s top aides Jon Duecker and Patrick Reese, the Inquirer reports.

* Experts debated likely sentences for the convicted AG, with Kane facing an absolute maximum term of 18 to 36 years in prison, according to the Tribune-Review.

* Mayor Jim Kenney condemned a Philadelphia police officer who was photographed with a Nazi-style tattoo on his forearm, the Inquirer reports.

* Underlining bipartisan liquor reforms, Gov. Tom Wolf and Republican state senate president Mike Turzai bought wine from a Wegmans supermarket, the Post-Gazette reports.

* State courts ruled in favor of PA’s Department of Environmental Protection in a lawsuit over oil and gas drilling regulations, the Tribune-Review reports.

* The PA Public Utilities Commission upheld an $11.4 million fine against ridesharing service Uber, according to the Post-Gazette.

* Philadelphia’s repaired commuter railcars began to trickle back into service, months after their removal due to structural failures, PhillyMag writes.

* Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty laid out a plan to boost PA manufacturing at a campaign stop in Erie, the Times-News writes.

* Former Philadelphia Judge William Berry, sentenced to probation for violating conflict of interest rules, filed an appeal to get his pension back, the Inquirer writes.

* A broad coalition formed the “Vision Zero Alliance” in Philly to lobby for government policies that would eliminate pedestrian and cyclist deaths, PlanPhilly writes.

* A new census report shows that women comprise just 17 percent of business owners in the Philadelphia area, Newsworks reports.

* Attendance is up at Philadelphia’s beleaguered public schools, according to Keystone Crossroads.

 

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Coming in the September issue of City & State PA: Spotlight on the Healthcare Industry

A special section dedicated to health care-related issues provides an ideal forum for you to educate and enlighten Pennsylvania’s policymakers on your company’s benefits and objectives. Among the topics to be explored: the pharmaceutical industry; digital technology; and health care for the vulnerable.

Ad deadline: Sept. 22; issue date: Sept. 27, with bonus distribution at the Healthcare Symposium presented by City&State PA Events. For further information, please contact Annette Schnur, Director of Business Development, at 215-490-9314, x 3004 or aschnur@cityandstatepa.com

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THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE:

* Hillary Clinton broke political fundraising records, drumming up $143 million in August, according to CNN.

* Bill Clinton used tax dollars to subsidize the controversial Clinton Foundation, according to a report by Politico.

* Donald Trump will make a campaign stop in Philadelphia, where he enjoys single-digit support, to stump for African American votes, the Inquirer reports.

* A study by PA’s left-leaning Keystone Research Center, a think tank, credits the rise of Trump to economic insecurity among white men, the Morning Call writes.

 

EDITORIAL PAGES:

* The Inquirer revisits Philly DA Seth Williams’ belated report on received gifts to tackle his disturbing sense of entitlement, evidenced most by his Eagles sideline passes.

* A Daily News editorial also marvels at the sense of entitlement shown by local pols, positing maybe it’s a “sort of Zika that infects their brains,” causing loss of judgment. 

* The Daily Times appreciates the magnitude of the recent court ruling against Lower Merion School District’s budget and tax manipulation and obfuscation.

* A LancasterOnline editorial comprehensively calls out the School District of Lancaster for continuing to fight to deny immigrant students access to decent education.

* The Standard-Speaker will be watching to see if interim AG Bruce Beemer can not only restore morale and integrity to the office, but also eradicate Porngate culture.

* Newsworks’ Dick Polman breaks down Trump’s post-Mexico immigration speech, writing that “the John C. Holmes of demagoguery” is back to his old tricks.

* The Post-Gazette is gobsmacked by Pittsburgh police chief Cameron McClay’s recent decision to make certain offenses reportable only by phone – not in person by officers.

* The Observer-Reporter offers up two cautionary tales of towns that botched downtown revitalization programs in advance of Monongahela’s just-launched effort.

* A Pocono Record editorial wants PA to take advantage of the untapped hydroelectric potential in the state – some 679 megawatts’ worth.

 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Want to wish someone a happy birthday in our newsletter? Email us their name, job title and upcoming birthday at editor@cityandstatepa.com 

 

TODAY’S SKED:

No events are scheduled for the Gov. Wolf, Mayor Kenney, the PA House, PA Senate or Philadelphia City Council.

 

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Connect with thousands of Pennsylvania influencers 

Advertise in City & State PA magazine and in First Read. For more information, contact Annette Schnur: aschnur@cityandstatepa.com 

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KICKER: “Pennsylvania is finally moving into the 21st century.” – PA Senate president MIke Turzai buys wine from a supermarket following liquor reforms that probably only move Pennsylvania into the mid-20th century – not that anyone is actually complaining. From The Inquirer.